The NYC Neighborhood Guide For College Grads


If you have dreams of moving to the Big Apple after graduation, there’s a lot you’re going to have to learn before packing your bags and hitting the road. Of course, finding an apartment is no easy task (especially in NYC), but figuring out where you should live can be the most confusing! After all, there are over 250 neighborhoods scattered throughout New York City. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, try using Triplemint. Triplemint will help recent grads find their perfect apartment and makes renting in NYC smarter, simpler and more cost efficient. To help you narrow down your search, we thought we’d give you a little insight on what some of the most popular neighborhoods are actually like. Below is your NYC neighborhood guide to help you out on your search for a new pad! Good luck!

East Side Neighborhoods

Upper East (UES)

When people in their early twenties say they live in the upper East Side, they like to think it sounds like they are living the life of Gossip Girl; private school uniforms (even though we’re old now), penthouse apartments and lunch on the steps of The Met. In reality, they are living somewhere in the 80’s or 90’s, not far from the 6 train but not very close to much else. It’s a great spot to live if you’re not interested in the loud chaos of downtown 24/7. But- you have to be willing to be the one making the effort to see your friends, because it is almost as hard to convince people to go out in UES as it is to convince them to venture to Brooklyn. Although the neighborhood is relatively quiet, there are a lot of great restaurants and a couple of cute bars. (You can find attractive people at The Penrose any night of the week.)

Murray Hill (Murray Chill, Bro-ey Hill)

A few years ago this was the go-to spot for every 23-year-old recent grad whose frat brother’s dad’s friend got him a job in finance. There are tons of divey bars with 90’s music all down 2nd Avenue, and a super easy commute to all of the banks, whether they are in midtown, FiDi or on Park Ave. Because of this convenience, none of these guys seem to have any plans of moving any time soon, and so now the average age has bumped up to around 25-26, and the new generation of 23-year-olds had to find a new spot (see Hell’s Kitchen.)

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East Village (EV); Lower East Side (LES)

EV and LES still have some grit, although they are both rapidly being gentrified by recent college grads who are not rich enough to live on the west side and not hipster enough to move to Brooklyn. Cons: no subways for miles. Pros: amazing bars and all of the best brunch spots within a few blocks of each other. This is the perfect spot to live if you love hosting the pregame/postgame for any night out.

West Side Neighborhoods

Upper West

Beautiful brownstones, half of which are empty while their owners live in one of their many other homes. Many are filled with either rich older couples or families with little kids. Although it’s not as trendy as some of the more pricey neighborhoods, the Upper West Side is a more affordable option that will also put you close to Central Park in case you’re in the need for some park time. There are definitely some cute restaurants up here, but in general this is not the neighborhood for a night out.

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Hell’s Kitchen

The new Murray Chill: filled with 23-year-old former-frat finance bros. Despite it’s past, it’s now generally one of the safer areas to live in. If you enjoy being a part of the constant hustle and bustle of the daily NYC grind, this is the spot for you. And if you enjoy going out, Ninth Ave is loaded with all sorts of bars to check out! One thing’s for sure; you won’t get bored living here.

Meatpacking

Does anybody actually live here? Meatpacking is overflowing with clubs, and therefore drunk girls stumbling in their heels in the cobblestone roads at 3 a.m. You would need some hardcore earplugs if you planned to live in this neighborhood.

West Village (WV)

The ideal spot to live in your early twenties – if you have a trust fund that is. This neighborhood is filled with tons of adorable bars and restaurants. There are almost limitless options for both dinner and brunch (because let’s be real those are the only meals that matter), from Pacman dumplings at RedFarm to kale salads at Westville to smoked salmon and avocado toast at Jack’s Wife Freda. There are amazing happy hour spots (ex: The Happiest Hour) with impressive cocktail menus, as well as charming little speakeasies you can only find if you’re really looking (bring your friends to The Garrett and watch everyone’s looks of confusion as you walk through a Five Guys to the secret stairwell in the back.)

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Other Neighborhoods

Financial Disctrict (FiDi)

FiDi is the spot to move if you’re young, you want an easy commute and you don’t mind traveling for your night out. It’s basically the opposite of the East Village. Almost every train line ends up running through FiDi, so even if you don’t work down there, getting to work in the morning is still super convenient. There isn’t much in the way of bars and nightlife. But- it’s one of the cleanest and most quiet areas of the city at night and on the weekends, and there is always Stone Street in the summer!

Times Square

The ONLY reason to be in Times Square is if you are going to a happy hour after work at the rooftop bar of a hotel. Otherwise, avoid at all costs.

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Do you have any more advice, tips or comments about a certain NYC neighborhood? Let us know in the comments!

*This is a sponsored post. All opinions are my own.

Featured Image Source: pinterest.com


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