10 Sexual Harassment Examples You Need To Know When Entering The Workplace


You’ve got the new job, However, when entering the workplace, you need to know about sexual harassment that could occur. Equalrights.org defines workplace sexual harassment as, “unwelcome verbal, visual, non-verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature. Or based on someone’s sex. Also, that it is severe or pervasive, creating a hostile working environment or affecting working conditions.” To make things a little clearer, here are 10 sexual harassment examples when entering the workplace.

Looking Up and Down or Staring At a Person’s Body

10 Sexual Harassment Examples You Need To Know When Entering The Workplace

“Accidentally” Brushing Up Against a Person

10 Sexual Harassment Examples You Need To Know When Entering The Workplace

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Following a Person Around

10 Sexual Harassment Examples You Need To Know When Entering The Workplace

Asking About Someone’s Sexual Orientation

10 Sexual Harassment Examples You Need To Know When Entering The Workplace

Asking About a Person’s Sex Life

10 Sexual Harassment Examples You Need To Know When Entering The Workplace

Repeatedly Asking For Dates Despite Being Turned Down

10 Sexual Harassment Examples You Need To Know When Entering The Workplace

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Making Sexual Remarks About Appearance or Body Parts

10 Sexual Harassment Examples You Need To Know When Entering The Workplace

Sending Sexually Suggestive Text Messages Notes or Emails

10 Sexual Harassment Examples You Need To Know When Entering The Workplace

Making Comments About a Person’s Gender

Some comments about a person’s gender could be considered sexual harassment. An example of this is someone saying you only got the promotion because you’re a hot female.

Quid Pro Quo Harassment

Of all the sexual harassment examples, this might be one of the worst. According to Nolo.com, “this occurs when a supervisor’s request for sexual favors or other sexual conduct results in a tangible job action. Examples include “I’ll give you the promotion if you sleep with me” or “I’ll fire you unless you go out with me.” You’re pretty much stuck between a rock and a hard place.

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What To Do If You’ve Been Sexually Harassed At Work

Now I’m not going to paraphrase because this is a serious matter. The people behind Equal Rights Advocates know far more than me when it comes to sexual harassment in the workplace and I’m not going to try and reword what they’re saying when I believe this is exactly what you should do if any of the sexual harassment examples above, or other examples, has ever happened to you. This is exactly what Equal Rights Advocates says to do when you’ve been sexually harassed at work.

Say “No” Clearly. Tell the person that his/her behavior offends you. Firmly refuse all invitations. If the harassment doesn’t end promptly, ask the harasser to stop and put it in writing. Keep a copy of this written communication.

Write Down What Happened. As soon as you experience sexual harassment, start writing it down. Write down dates, places, times, and possible witnesses to what happened. If possible, ask your co-workers to write down what they saw or heard, especially if the same thing is happening to them. Remember that others may (and probably will) read this written record at some point. It is a good idea to keep the record at home or in some other safe place. Do not keep the record at work.

Report The Harassment. If it is possible for you to do so, tell your supervisor, your human resources department or some other department or person within your organization who has the power to stop the harassment. If you can, it is best to put your complaint in writing.

Start A Paper Trail. When you report the sexual harassment to your employer, do it in writing. Describe the problem and how you want it fixed. This creates a written record of when you complained and what happened in response to it. Keep copies of everything you send and receive from your employer.

Do not delay in reporting the problem to your employer. Under federal law, you have 300 days from an act of sexual harassment to file a complaint with the EEOC[Equal Employment Opportunity Commission]. Under your state’s fair employment law, if one exists in your state, you may have as few as 180 days to file a complaint.

Was there ever a time you were sexually harassed in the workplace? How did you handle the situation? Are there other sexual harassment examples that you’d like to share? Let us know in the comments below.

Featured Image Source: https://www.businessinsider.com/working-in-a-wework-2016-7
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