I Quit My Job And Here’s What Happened


Quitting your job is one of those things you see happen in movies, but it’s hard to imagine doing it and doing it successfully. Don’t do it on impulse. It’s best to have a plan lined up so that you’re not struggling financially. Be sure that you have a proper support system as well. Nothing is harder than giving up your job without support from your friends and family. I decided to quit my job because I was extremely unhappy and felt unappreciated. Keep reading to find out why I quit my job and what happened afterwards.

Why Do You Want to Quit?

I was so unhappy working for a call-center that every shift I would find a little cubicle, lay my head down, and cry. It was hard. My job as a fraud analyst was to help people, but half of the time I was being yelled and cursed at. It was affecting my relationship, and emotional stability. On my days off I would just lay in bed and not move for hours on end. I made the decision to quit one day while talking about it with my fiance. However, we both agreed that I needed to have a plan in place before I made any decisions.

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2. Devise a Plan

Before putting in my two week notice, I made a list of the pros and cons of quitting my job. One of the  biggest pros included a happier me. One advantage I had was that I still had access to my previous job as a customer service adviser. I worked usually when they needed an extra hand, which wasn’t often, but I was in great standing with the store manager. Which meant that I could start working there as much as I wanted once I quit my other job as a fraud analyst. The downside was substantially greater than the pros. The pay was more and I had a guaranteed forty-hour work week as a fraud analyst. These were huge for me because we were saving for a wedding, while trying to pay rent and our other bills. Ultimately, with support from my amazing fiance I put in my two week notice. We decided my mental sanity was more important than a slightly larger paycheck.

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3. Two Week Waiting Period

The two week waiting period feels like you’re in limbo. By this time your boss is aware that you’re leaving as are your co-workers, and it’s awkward. I say this because it feels as if you have betrayed your workplace. Everyone seems to question your motives, and whisper to everyone that you’re leaving. This made me want to leave even sooner. My trainer would whisper to my supervisor as I passed, and then they would approach me, curious about how I was feeling. This two week limbo period made me feel stuck, but I’m thankful I had support.

4. My Feelings After I Quit

My last day at work was one of the best days of my life. I walked out of the building and a sense of relief came over me. I smiled to myself, and suddenly I felt happy. It felt as if the invisible anchor above my head disappeared. My relationship with my fiance grew stronger. I no longer went home upset about work, and that he had so much faith in me. That is one of the greatest feelings in the world. Working at a call center can be a calling for many people, and I applaud everyone who works at one. It’s hard work.

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5. Resuming My Old Job

Before resuming my old job I took a much needed two week break before I did. I needed to regain my sanity and come out of the depressed state I was in. After my mini break, I dove right in at my previous job. It was very weird at first. One of my shift leads, who I thought was a friend, mocked me in front of a customer because I decided to work there full-time again. Other co-workers were happy to see me, and glad that I was able to leave a job that made me very unhappy. Quitting a job isn’t easy and without a plan set it place it can potentially make it harder on you. Trust your gut, I did, and I don’t regret it at all.

If you’re planning on quitting your job, let us know how your planning is going or let us know how your life is after you quit.
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