The Ultimate Ranking Of Freshman Dorms At Tulane University


Are you wondering which dorms at Tulane University are the best? Don’t worry! If you’re looking for the best freshman dorms at Tulane University, look no further! From quiet halls, perfect for studying, to louder, more social halls, you’ll find the right one for you.

1. Wall

Wall is the new honors dorm at Tulane. It is a co-ed community where boys and girls are interspersed evenly. Each floor has many social groups that are usually from the same floor or even the same hallway. Wall definitely isn’t the place to be if you want to go out every night or have a party in your room though. It is social but in a very studious way, quiet hours are usually pretty strictly enforced and the study rooms and common rooms are generally full of people working on essays, studying, and listening to music. The rooms are new and nice.

The ceilings are concrete which gives them kind of a trendy industrial vibe. If you get a room on one half of the fourth floor or anywhere on the fifth floor you get really high ceilings. The rooms are also all suite style, which means you only share a bathroom with three other people and each room has its own sink. Not having communal bathrooms is probably Wall’s biggest perk. The only real detriment to living in wall(unless you want a party dorm) is that a lot of the rooms have been tripled this year because of the large freshman class. Also there’s a bit of a cockroach problem, but that’s most of the dorms.

2. Butler

Butler used to be the honors dorm. It is co-ed, with separate floors for boys and girls. The top floors house the health wave residential community where the people who actually go to Reily live. This dorm has a really good social dynamic but is still pretty calm, you wont necessarily be kept up at night by a party but the floors definitely have a nice vibe, people going in and out of each others rooms, etc. The rooms are ok, regular doubles with carpeted floors. There’s lots of storage in the form of cabinets and bookshelves. The bathrooms are communal but are kept generally pretty clean. I’ve heard some complaints that the showers are too small.

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3. Josephine Louise

A lot of people don’t want to live in JL because it’s an all female dorm. But it is in a lovely three story building, and one of the four original Newcomb buildings. The rooms don’t have standard measurements and each one has its own character. The lobby is cozy and historic. The bathrooms are communal but many of the rooms have a sink and mirror in one corner. A downside is that male visitors are required to be chaperoned more closely than in any of the other dorms.

4. Patterson House

Patterson houses the “change-maker” residential community. It houses multiple grades and is coed. Patterson has a reputation as the hippie dorm, and it’s where everyone goes to smoke pot. It has a really nice social dynamic, although the freshmen and upperclassmen seem to be pretty separated. There is a mixture of suite and communal style bathrooms. Many of the rooms open out onto the outdoor balconies, some can even be accessed without going through the lobby. As downsides go, the rooms are pretty old and yucky. There is a pretty serious mold problem and I’ve heard many people complain about the smell.

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5. Monroe

Monroe is divided in half, boys and girls. It’s a pretty crazy party dorm, I’ve seen videos of beer pong set up in people’s rooms. If you’re looking for a quiet place to study, Monroe is not your friend. Also, the rooms are tiny; in some of them you can reach out from your bed and hold your roommates hand. If you’re looking for a “typical Freshman dorm” though this might be  a solid place to be. It’s decently clean, all through the bathrooms are less so.

6. Sharp

It’s Monroe but louder and dirtier.

Which of these freshman dorms at Tulane University did you live in? Share your experience in the comments below!
Featured photo source: mapio.net
Comments, Questions & Rants

Ella Helmuth

Ella is a Freshman at Tulane University studying English and history. After graduation she hopes to work in editing or publishing. You can find her with her nose in a book, on Pinterest, or exploring local stores and restaurants with her friends. She has a passion for travel and a serious case of wanderlust.

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